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Safeguarding Democratic CapitalismU.S. Foreign Policy and National Security, 1920-2015$
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Melvyn P Leffler

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780691196510

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: May 2020

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691196510.001.0001

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Strategy, Diplomacy, and the Cold War

Strategy, Diplomacy, and the Cold War

The United States, Turkey, And Nato, 1945–1952

Chapter:
(p.164) 5 Strategy, Diplomacy, and the Cold War
Source:
Safeguarding Democratic Capitalism
Author(s):

Melvyn P. Leffler

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691196510.003.0006

This chapter takes a look at U.S. war planning during the Cold War. Looking through Joint Chiefs of Staff records, the chapter shows that U.S. war planning, although crude, began in the early months of 1946. If war erupted, for whatever reasons, the war plans called for the United States to strike the Soviet Union (USSR). Expecting Soviet armies to overrun most of Europe very quickly, planners assumed that the United States would launch its attack primarily from bases in the United Kingdom and the British-controlled Cairo-Suez base in the Middle East. To protect the latter, it would be essential to slow down Soviet armies marching southward to conquer the Middle East. The United States needed the Turkish army to thwart Soviet military advances and required Turkish airfields to insure the success of the strategic offensive against targets inside the USSR.

Keywords:   war planning, NATO, Turkey, Cold War, Turkish airfields, Middle East, Soviet Union

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