Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Art of Being GovernedEveryday Politics in Late Imperial China$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Michael Szonyi

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780691197241

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: May 2020

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691197241.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM PRINCETON SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.princeton.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Princeton University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in PRSO for personal use.date: 24 October 2021

An Officer in Cahoots with Pirates

An Officer in Cahoots with Pirates

Coastal Garrisons and Maritime Smuggling

Chapter:
(p.83) Chapter Three An Officer in Cahoots with Pirates
Source:
The Art of Being Governed
Author(s):

Michael Szonyi

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691197241.003.0004

This chapter introduces the Jiang family, hereditary commanders of the garrison at Fuquan. At least one of their members was both an officer and also a smuggler and pirate. This story shows how families took advantage of their special position in the military system to gain advantage in illicit commerce. Their proximity to the state and their ability to negotiate the differences between the military and commercial realms using their special position gave them a competitive advantage in overseas trade. Families strategizing about how to work within military institutions, working the system to their advantage, making decisions about the degree to which they would or would not be incorporated by the Chinese state, played an important role in the development of China's diaspora and its global trade linkages. The chapter also talks about soldiers stationed in the garrison that had to adapt to the new contexts in which they found themselves and build new communities.

Keywords:   Jiang family, Fuquan, smuggler, pirate, military system, overseas trade, Chinese state, global trade, soldier

Princeton Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.