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The Art of Being GovernedEveryday Politics in Late Imperial China$
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Michael Szonyi

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780691197241

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: May 2020

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691197241.001.0001

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A God Becomes an Ancestor

A God Becomes an Ancestor

Post-Ming Legacies of the Military System

Chapter:
(p.191) Chapter Seven A God Becomes an Ancestor
Source:
The Art of Being Governed
Author(s):

Michael Szonyi

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691197241.003.0008

This chapter talks about the garrisons after the fall of the Ming. Even after the Ming military institution no longer existed, it continued to matter to the people who had lived in it. Some refused to let the institution die, seeking to maintain the prerogatives they had enjoyed under it. Others found they had inherited obligations that survived the change in dynasty and had to find ways to manage those obligations. Still others tried to adapt elements of the Ming institution to suit the new context. They found ways to make themselves legible to the Qing state, and they did so using language that Qing officials could accept, even though the language described social institutions that were actually very different from what they seemed.

Keywords:   garrisons, Ming military institution, dynasty, Qing state, social institutions

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