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Patchwork LeviathanPockets of Bureaucratic Effectiveness in Developing States$
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Erin Metz McDonnell

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9780691197364

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: September 2020

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691197364.001.0001

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Introducing Comparison Cases: Patchwork Leviathans in Comparative and Historical Perspective

Introducing Comparison Cases: Patchwork Leviathans in Comparative and Historical Perspective

Chapter:
(p.104) 5 Introducing Comparison Cases: Patchwork Leviathans in Comparative and Historical Perspective
Source:
Patchwork Leviathan
Author(s):

Erin Metz McDonnell

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691197364.003.0005

This chapter peels back the earliest seeds of unusually effective clustered distinctiveness. It introduces comparison cases, which confirm the importance of recruitment, cultivation, and protection, while also shedding light on subtle variations in how those mechanics play out in different environments. The comparison cases provide additional analytic leverage from within-case contrasts in cases that were formerly ineffectual but that rapidly transformed into pockets of effectiveness. The chapter concludes with theoretical observations that emerge about the onset of a bureaucratic ethos, presenting the more vexing theoretical question of how bureaucratic niches first emerge. These insights include whether niches appear upon the formation of a new organization or result from reforms to an existing organization, the speed of change, and the scale of niches.

Keywords:   comparison cases, historical perspective, clustered distinctiveness, bureaucratic ethos, bureaucratic niches, Ghana

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