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Democratic FederalismThe Economics, Politics, and Law of Federal Governance$
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Robert Inman and Daniel L. Rubinfeld

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9780691202129

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: January 2021

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691202129.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM PRINCETON SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.princeton.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Princeton University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in PRSO for personal use.date: 24 October 2021

Economic Federalism

Economic Federalism

Chapter:
(p.37) 2 Economic Federalism
Source:
Democratic Federalism
Author(s):

Robert P. Inman

Daniel L. Rubinfeld

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691202129.003.0002

This chapter examines, both theoretically and empirically, the causal connections from multiple local and provincial governments and their local assignment of revenues and services to the three goals of economic efficiency, political participation, and the protection of rights and liberties. Economic Federalism does not require the direct representation of provincial or local governments within the central government. Rather, the central government is managed by a single leader, a president, elected nationally. The president makes and implements all national policies. The chapter then reviews the theory and evidence as to the performance of competitive lower-tier governments and finds that allowing citizens variety and choice provides significant economic benefits in efficiency and growth. Matters are less clear for how Economic Federalism might perform against the goals of democratic participation and the protection of rights and liberties.

Keywords:   local governments, provincial governments, economic efficiency, political participation, protection of rights, protection of liberties, Economic Federalism, central government, president, lower-tier governments

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