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A Course in Microeconomic Theory$
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David M. Kreps

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9780691202754

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: May 2021

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691202754.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM PRINCETON SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.princeton.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Princeton University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in PRSO for personal use.date: 28 September 2021

Monopoly

Monopoly

Chapter:
(p.299) Chapter Nine Monopoly
Source:
A Course in Microeconomic Theory
Author(s):

David M. Kreps

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691202754.003.0009

This chapter describes the theory of monopoly. In a monopoly market, there are many buyers and a single vendor of a good. The single vendor is called the monopoly. Buyers are assumed to be price takers, and their demand as a function of price is given, as in the case of perfect competition, by an aggregate demand function. One reason one might find a monopoly industry is because, while other companies can enter this industry, the monopoly acts in a way that forestalls potential competitors. If substitute products are produced and sold, they restrain the monopoly's market power by flattening and shifting-in the monopoly's demand curve. The idea of substitutes for a monopoly product comes up in another context — that of multigood monopolies. The chapter then looks at nonlinear pricing.

Keywords:   monopoly, monopoly market, perfect competition, market power, substitute products, demand curve, monopoly product, multigood monopolies, nonlinear pricing

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