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The Imam of the ChristiansThe World of Dionysius of Tel-Mahre, c. 750-850$
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Philip Wood

Print publication date: 2021

Print ISBN-13: 9780691212791

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: September 2021

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691212791.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM PRINCETON SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.princeton.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Princeton University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in PRSO for personal use.date: 04 December 2021

Changing Centres of Power

Changing Centres of Power

Harran, Kakushta and Cyrrhus

Chapter:
(p.97) 4 Changing Centres of Power
Source:
The Imam of the Christians
Author(s):

Philip Wood

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691212791.003.0005

This chapter examines how pre-Islamic elites survived into the ninth century and how ancient claims to ecclesiastical authority came into conflict with the new settlements created by the Arab conquerors of the Middle East. It describes the Kufa and Basra in southern Iraq and Fustat in Egypt as the most famous settlements, which were later joined by smaller centres such as Wasit, Merv, Shiraz, and Mosul. It also mentions conquerors in the amṣār that were paid cash stipends from the revenue generated by taxes, which in turn organized Islamic justice and governance. The chapter identifies three trends in the changing geography of power in the first three centuries of Arab rule in the Middle East. It includes the shift toward a small number of significant cities, the growing centralization of government, and the movement of the centre of power.

Keywords:   pre-Islamic elites, ecclesiastical authority, Arab conquerors, amṣār, Islamic justice, Islamic governance, Arab rule, Middle East

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